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​Elon Musk develops the Internet

Entrepreneur and founder of SpaceX Elon Musk has published a picture, which captures 60 Internet satellites, which will soon be sent into orbit. To do this, they were assembled in a special design.

Satellites, according to the Mask are design and presentation not version devices. They are the first in the framework of the Starlink initiative of SpaceX.

It is expected that the first network Starlink will include 11, 943 satellite. They will be sent into low earth orbit.

SpaceX company Elon Musk on Saturday will launch the first test satellites for its future communication network. With their help, it plans to provide Internet access around the world. But it has serious competitors.

The new SpaceX test attracts far less attention than its recent launch of the world's most powerful Falcon Heavy rocket. Musk didn't even mention the event on Twitter, because so far it's more of a prototype test. But if it succeeds, SpaceX plans to launch commercial satellites next year and complete a network of more than 11,000 satellites in low earth orbit by 2024.

Where it all started

Work on this project, SpaceX began in 2014, but then focused on improving their core space of the Falcon 9 rocket and preparing the long-delayed launch, the Falcon Heavy.

The launch of test satellites means that the company is still involved in the race for Internet access. Previously, Google wanted to create its own network of satellites. But then it became one of SpaceX's largest investors when it raised $1 billion in a round of investments three years ago. Meanwhile, Japanese SoftBank and Richard Branson support the European OneWeb, which hopes to provide broadband access to the Internet, 2019 Total U.S. regulators received 12 applications for the testing of satellites providing Internet access. In addition, Facebook wants to provide Internet connection in remote corners of the Earth using drones.

During the tests, SpaceX will orbit two small satellites and test communications with several stations on Earth, including Tesla headquarters. It is expected that one of the main applications of future 5G networks will be high-speed data transmission to self-driving cars. SpaceX plans to build a so-called peer-to-peer (mesh) network of satellites, which allows to transfer information between them and provide full coverage of the Earth.

Data transmission over networks could increase dramatically in the near future, given the large number of satellite companies. "There will be insatiable demand in the future," says Chuck Robbins, CEO of Cisco Systems. But it's too early to predict how many competing satellite networks will support 5G, he says.

At the beginning of the century, several ambitious satellite projects failed, causing investment in the industry to slow down. But since then, the economic attractiveness of such projects has increased significantly. "The bankruptcy of Globalstar and Iridium scared everyone away," says Robert Twiggs, one of the inventors of the new generation of inexpensive satellites, which reduced the cost of space projects.
Small satellites in low orbits have so far been used for satellite imagery of the Earth – for example, in the agricultural and energy industries. But they have not yet been used for data transmission over communication networks. Their proximity to the Ground can help to avoid delays that arise from the satellites into higher orbits.

This week, the SpaceX plan was personally supported by the Chairman of the us Federal communications Commission Ajit Pai. He called on the other members of the Commission to approve the company's application for a communication license. The SpaceX project will provide high-speed Internet access to residents in rural areas of the United States, said Pai. Thus, SpaceX may be the first American company to obtain this license – following the European OneWeb, Space Norway and Canadian Telesat.

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